This Advisory supplements our previous advisories dated January 2018, December 2016, December 2015 (as supplemented in January 2016), October 2014, October 2013, November 2012, November 2011, and October 2010, addressing requirements of the Affordable Care Act (“ACA”). Below is a summary of recent developments impacting health care reform, as well as other recent developments affecting employer-sponsored health plans that will be relevant for employer-sponsored plans in 2019.

Review and Update Plan SPDs
Given the changes that have been made to health care reform over the years (legislative changes, new regulations, courts cases, etc.), clients are well advised to take a fresh look at their summary plan descriptions for certain less obvious changes that might be required. While clients might annually update their summary plan descriptions in ordinary course for co-pays, eligibility and contact information, there are additional technical changes that may or may not be required for certain arrangements.

Individual Mandate Repeal
The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “Act”) eliminates the shared responsibility payment for those individuals who fail to maintain minimum essential health coverage beginning January 1, 2019. The Act did not, however, repeal the employer shared responsibility mandate or reporting requirements. Those requirements are still in play, and the IRS has been actively enforcing these requirements against employers.

ACA Information Reporting Deadlines Extended
The IRS has extended the due dates for furnishing individuals with 2018 ACA information returns on Forms 1095-B and 1095-C from January 31, 2019 to March 4, 2019. The IRS did not, however, extend the deadline for filing ACA information returns with IRS, which remains February 28, 2019 if not filing electronically and April 1, 2019 if filing electronically.

The IRS has extended good-faith transition relief from ACA reporting penalties for employers that can demonstrate they have made good faith efforts to comply with the 2018 information reporting requirements. This relief, however, applies only to furnishing and filing incorrect or incomplete information and not to a failure to timely furnish or file a statement or return. In the latter case, penalties may apply absent reasonable cause.

To read the full advisory on the Kelley Drye website, click here.